Clinical characteristics and treatment outcomes of chronic dacryocystitis-related corneal ulcers

Authors: Huang Qing,  Shan Fengmei,  Li Jie,  Zhang Xiaoyu,  Lu Xiuhai,  Wang Fuhua,  Gao Hua,  Qi Xiaolin
DOI: 10.3760/cma.j.cn115989-20220113-00013
Published 2024-05-10
Cite as Chin J Exp Ophthalmol, 2024, 42(5): 442-447.

Abstract                              [Download PDF] [Read Full Text]

Objective

To analyze the clinical characteristics and treatment outcomes of chronic dacryocystitis-related corneal ulcers and to provide a basis for the rational clinical diagnosis and treatment.

Methods

An observational case series study was performed.A total of 31 patients (31 eyes) diagnosed with chronic dacryocystitis-related corneal ulcers in Eye Hospital of Shandong First Medical University were enrolled from January 2016 to January 2020, with an average age of (53.0±10.8) years.The typical ocular signs, results of the etiological examination and microbial sensitivity test, treatment process and outcomes were analyzed.This study adhered to the Declaration of Helsinki and was approved by the Ethics Committee of Eye Hospital of Shandong First Medical University (No.20191020-1).Written informed consent was obtained from each subject before any medical examination.

Results

The average history of chronic dacryocystitis was (3.6±1.9) years.Corneal ulcers were mostly located in the peripheral cornea and had a rounded morphology with clear borders.The positive rate of corneal scraping was 74.2%(23/31), with bacteria in 19 eyes, fungal hyphae in 3 eyes, and both gram-positive cocci and fungal hyphae in 1 eye.The positive rate of microbial culture was 74.2%(23/31), with positive bacterial culture in 20 eyes (gram-positive cocci in 16 eyes and gram-negative bacilli in 4 eyes) and fungal growth in 3 eyes.The sensitivity rates of gram-positive cocci to vancomycin, rifampicin, moxifloxacin, and levofloxacin were 100%(16/16), 87.5%(14/16), 81.3%(13/16), and 75.0%(12/16), respectively.All patients were treated with surgery for chronic dacryocystitis, including 22 cases of endoscopic dacryocystorhinostomy, 7 cases of dacryocystectomy, and 2 cases of lacrimal duct probing combined with intubation.Among the 9 cases with an ulcer depth of <1/3 of the corneal thickness (CT), 6 cases were cured after (10.8±3.2) days of drug treatment and 3 cases underwent corneal lesion resection.The 6 patients with an ulcer depth of 1/3-2/3 of the CT underwent conjunctival flap covering surgery.Among the 16 patients with an ulcer depth of >2/3 of the CT, lamellar keratoplasty was performed in 6 cases, penetrating keratoplasty in 8 cases and evisceration in 2 cases with infectious endophthalmitis.

Conclusions

Chronic dacryocystitis-related corneal ulcers are mainly located at the periphery of the cornea, and gram-positive cocci infections are the most common pathogenic bacteria.In patients with mild symptoms, corneal ulcers heal gradually after treatment with sensitive antibiotics.For patients with severe infections, appropriate surgery should be selected according to the depth of the corneal ulcer.

Key words:

Dacryocystitis; Corneal ulcers; Bacteria; Drug sensitivity test; Treatment outcomes

Contributor Information

Huang Qing

Eye Hospital of Shandong First Medical University (Shandong Eye Hospital), State Key Laboratory Cultivation Base, Shandong Provincial Key Laboratory of Ophthalmology, Shandong Eye Institute, Shandong First Medical University &

Shandong Academy of Medical Sciences, Jinan 250021, China

Shan Fengmei

Eye Hospital of Shandong First Medical University (Shandong Eye Hospital), State Key Laboratory Cultivation Base, Shandong Provincial Key Laboratory of Ophthalmology, Shandong Eye Institute, Shandong First Medical University &

Shandong Academy of Medical Sciences, Jinan 250021, China

Li Jie

Eye Hospital of Shandong First Medical University (Shandong Eye Hospital), State Key Laboratory Cultivation Base, Shandong Provincial Key Laboratory of Ophthalmology, Shandong Eye Institute, Shandong First Medical University &

Shandong Academy of Medical Sciences, Jinan 250021, China

Zhang Xiaoyu

Eye Hospital of Shandong First Medical University (Shandong Eye Hospital), State Key Laboratory Cultivation Base, Shandong Provincial Key Laboratory of Ophthalmology, Shandong Eye Institute, Shandong First Medical University &

Shandong Academy of Medical Sciences, Jinan 250021, China

Lu Xiuhai

Eye Hospital of Shandong First Medical University (Shandong Eye Hospital), State Key Laboratory Cultivation Base, Shandong Provincial Key Laboratory of Ophthalmology, Shandong Eye Institute, Shandong First Medical University &

Shandong Academy of Medical Sciences, Jinan 250021, China

Wang Fuhua

Eye Hospital of Shandong First Medical University (Shandong Eye Hospital), State Key Laboratory Cultivation Base, Shandong Provincial Key Laboratory of Ophthalmology, Shandong Eye Institute, Shandong First Medical University &

Shandong Academy of Medical Sciences, Jinan 250021, China

Gao Hua

Eye Hospital of Shandong First Medical University (Shandong Eye Hospital), State Key Laboratory Cultivation Base, Shandong Provincial Key Laboratory of Ophthalmology, Shandong Eye Institute, Shandong First Medical University &

Shandong Academy of Medical Sciences, Jinan 250021, China

Qi Xiaolin

Eye Hospital of Shandong First Medical University (Shandong Eye Hospital), State Key Laboratory Cultivation Base, Shandong Provincial Key Laboratory of Ophthalmology, Shandong Eye Institute, Shandong First Medical University &

Shandong Academy of Medical Sciences, Jinan 250021, China

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