Effect and significance of secretogranin Ⅲ in diabetic retinal neovascularization

Authors: Wang Manqiao,  Li Xiaorong
DOI: 10.3760/cma.j.cn115989-20201012-00688
Published 2024-01-10
Cite as Chin J Exp Ophthalmol, 2024, 42(1): 93-96.

Abstract                              [Download PDF] [Read Full Text]

Secretogranin Ⅲ (SCG3) is a kind of secretory granule widely distributed in tissues and cells with endocrine functions in the human body.As a member of the granin family, it is generally considered to be involved in endocrine and neuroendocrine regulatory activities, and also as a highly disease-selective angiogenic factor that reduces vascular leakage and neovascularization in animal models of diabetic retinopathy and retinopathy of prematurity.In addition, SCG3 also co-expresses with inflammatory factors, anti-brain-derived neurotrophic factors in nerve cells.This article reviewed the current understanding of SCG3 as a secretory granular protein and its granulocyte family, analyzed the distribution of SCG3 in vivo, discussed its role in angiogenesis, and considered the correlation between SCG3 and neovascularization.It focused on the possible role and significance of SCG3 in diabetic retinopathy, especially in relation to microangiopathy, inflammatory factors and retinal neurodegeneration.By comparing the differences between SCG3 and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in the binding of signaling pathways and related receptors, the effects and advantages of anti-SCG3 drugs in the treatment of DR were prospected.

Key words:

Secretogranin Ⅲ; Diabetic retinopathy; Angiogenesis; Angiogenic factor; Vascular endothelial growth factor

Contributor Information

Wang Manqiao

Tianjin Key Laboratory Retinal Functions and Diseases, Tianjin Branch of National Clinical Research Center for Ocular Disease, Eye Institute and School of Optometry, Tianjin Medical University Eye Hospital, Tianjin 300384, China

Li Xiaorong

Tianjin Key Laboratory Retinal Functions and Diseases, Tianjin Branch of National Clinical Research Center for Ocular Disease, Eye Institute and School of Optometry, Tianjin Medical University Eye Hospital, Tianjin 300384, China

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