Effect of long noncoding RNA on retinal development and ocular diseases

Authors: Wang Bin,  Zhang Yan

DOI: 10.3760/cma.j.issn.2095-0160.2017.01.017
Published 2017-01-10
Cite as Chin J Exp Ophthalmol, 2017,35(1): 79-82.

Abstract

Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) are non-protein coding transcript larger than 200 nucleotides, making up a large fraction of cellular transcripts in mammalian.Recent years have seen a surge of studies aimed at functionally characterizing the role of lncRNAs in development and disease.It has been proved that this kind of noncoding RNAs regulate gene expression at epigenetic, transcriptional, and post-transcriptional levels.Retinal development is dependent on an accurately functioning network of transcriptional and translational regulators.Among the diverse classes of molecules involved, lncRNAs play a significant role.LncRNAs are known or suspected to play a functional role in the specification and maturation of retinal cell subtypes and involved in several ocular related diseases.Though the molecular mechanism of most lncRNAs is still largely unclear, it is likely that these molecules represent a major component involved in retinal cell fate determination.In the process of retinal development, lncRNAs could induce cell differentiation, affect cell cycle and regulate X chromosome inactivation.lncRNAs also play an important role in ocular diseases, such as anophthalmia, diabetic retinopathy and spinocerebellar movement disorder type 7.This manuscript reviewed recent advances in the role of lncRNAs in retinal development and ocular diseases, and the existing problems, which is of great significance for basic and clinical research and the development of new therapeutic target.

Key words:

Long noncoding RNAs; Retina development; Ocular diseases

Contributor Information

Wang Bin
Department of Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Inner Mongolia General Forestry Hospital, Yakeshi 022150, China
Zhang Yan
Department of Ophthalmology, Inner Mongolia General Forestry Hospital, Yakeshi 022150, China
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